QUALITY STANDARDS

A named service for dementia advice and navigation is provided.

After you receive your diagnosis of dementia you will be contacted by a service which will provide you with dementia navigation. They will be your first point of contact for any information about post-diagnostic support for dementia. You should be provided with post-diagnostic information that is tailored to your needs, such as music therapy, art-based therapy, dementia cafes, peer support and allotment groups, and singing groups available in your local area.

At your first meeting with this service, they will help create or review your personalised dementia care plan. They will also discuss the dementia care pathway and discuss where you are up to on this document and how best to use it to inform what you can access in your community.
 
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People with dementia should be offered advice and support on improving their general health and maximising quality of life after diagnosis.

Dementia is a progressive illness which can affect every aspect of a person's life. But you can maintain a healthy and positive life with dementia.
You should be supported in understanding how to live healthily with dementia, maintaining a good quality of life, continuing with your social life, relationships with friends and family, and any hobbies and interests which you have. These aspects of your life should not be seen as irrelevant or less important by those who care and support you with your dementia.
 
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People diagnosed with dementia are provided with information on delirium and their increased risk of developing the condition.

People living with dementia are at a higher risk of developing delirium, which causes a short term confused state. Delirium can affect memory, concentration and personality. Delirium will usually improve, once the underlying illness is treated, but sometimes it can last for a while.

You should be informed of your greater risk of developing delirium and provided with information about the condition. The information will help you prevent delirium from developing and understand how to manage and treat the condition in somebody living with dementia.
 
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The association between dementia and hearing loss is recognised and services are provided to diagnose and treat hearing loss in those with dementia.

Hearing loss is associated with poorer cognitive functioning and the risk of developing dementia. If you have hearing loss this should be recognised as important by services which support you with your dementia.
You should have access to hearing tests to diagnose any hearing loss, and appropriate services to provide and maintain hearing aids.
 
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The association between dementia and the risk of developing a higher rate of tooth decay and gum disease is recognised and services provided.

People living with dementia have a higher rate of tooth decay and gum disease. Maintaining good oral health is important for overall wellbeing.
Your dentist should work with you to plan in advance how oral health can be maintained, including carer education to prevent decay, fluoride treatments, and regular screenings.
 
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People with dementia and carers will be able to access appropriate multi-disciplinary support at times of crisis through a clear, single point of contact

If you experience a crisis, which could be due to a number of reasons, you know where to go and how to access timely support and if needed further assessment.
 
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People living with dementia and their carers have the opportunity to participate in research.

You will be offered the opportunity to find out more about and sign up to Join Dementia Research by Memory Assessment Service staff or by the service which creates and reviews your care plan. They can help you sign up immediately or show you where to find out more information to decide later.

The focus of Joining Dementia Research is to increase the recruitment of volunteers, increase the numbers on the research register, match them to appropriate studies, and increase participation whilst informing volunteers of research opportunities. Anyone, with or without dementia, can register as a volunteer or sign-up for someone else, providing that you have their consent. Signing up is the first step in becoming involved in supporting vital research studies.
 
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All staff working more closely with people with dementia and carers have an understanding of behaviour that challenges (BtC) and know where and how to offer support or refer on as needed.

All staff working to support you have an understanding of behaviour that challenges (BtC) and know where and how to offer support or refer on as needed. Recognising that behaviours that staff may consider challenging is often a way of you maintaining a sense of control, dignity and wellbeing, and/or to ease discomfort or distress.

BtC can be defined as: ‘An expression of distress by the person living with dementia (or others in the environment) that arises from unmet health or psychosocial need(s). The behaviours often reflect attempts by the person living with dementia to maintain a sense of control, dignity and wellbeing, and/or to ease discomfort or distress.’
 
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Arts and creative therapies are to be available to people experiencing cognitive decline.

Arts and creative therapies are offered to people at early stages. Arts can stimulate sensory and motor activation, encourage social engagement, stimulate learning through creativity in a failure-free environment and help build cognitive reserve.
 
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People with dementia and cognitive impairment are enabled to access to the arts and heritage at all stages of the dementia well pathway.

Arts and creative therapies and maintaining a connection to these, be it things you have always enjoyed and engaged with and/or the offer of new engagement and alternatives are embedded in conversations with you, as part of person centred care planning.
 
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Family members are provided with information on what to expect when a loved one is admitted to an inpatient mental health unit for behaviour that challenges in the context of dementia.

You are provided with information about what to expect when your family member is admitted to an inpatient mental health ward. This information enables you to understand what to expect, how you will be able to contribute and be part of the assessment and care planning; if you are feeling that this would be welcomed. You are provided with support too as a carer by the ward team.
 
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